Résumé

The purpose of a résumé is to get an interview.  Your résumé is where employers will gather a first impression of you, your skills, your experience and your education. It needs to be clear, concise and captivating. Focus on Keywords and be specific to the industry.  

All résumé types are widely used. Choose the best type to highlight your skills and qualifications.  

Types of Résumés:

Reverse chronological: Most popular; emphasizes experience and employment history. Highlights information from most recent and relevant to oldest and least relevant.   

Functional:  100% skill based; emphasized specific skills and accomplishments.  Listing the skills by groups. Useful for those with gaps in work history, those who are seeking to change careers and those with a wide variety of skills.   

Combination: Combines the two; emphasizing skills and accomplishments, while also listing work history.  

Examples of each type can be found here or use the template below to get started: 

RESUME PACKET 

RESUME TEMPLATE

Create a Résumé or CV

 

Resume CV

What is the difference between a résumé and a curriculum vitae (CV)?  

  • Résumé is typical for all types of employment.  A résumé is a concise document with no more than 1 or 2 pages outlining your education, and the skills and accomplishments that are specific to your career of choice.       
  • CV is a longer more detailed version of a résumé that is typically used in educational employment, government employment, military employment or for those that have obtained a PhD or EdD. A CV consists of more than 2 pages and details all accomplishments, publications and skills.  
Brainstorm

First begin by brainstorming and writing down all of the experiences you have had.  Examples:

  • Technical skills
  • Volunteer experiences
  • Language Skills
  • Organizations in which you participate
  • Leadership experiences
  • Awards/Honors
  • Education/Certifications
  • Anything else of significance 

Reminder: Not all of your past experience is going to be relevant for your final résumé, based on the type of job for which you are applying. It is a good idea to have all of your relevant experiences to draw from to write a great résumé.   

Résumé or CV Layout

 

Stand Out Resumes

The purpose of a résumé is to get an interview.  Your résumé is where employers will gather a first impression of you, your skills, your experience and your education. It needs to be clear, concise and captivating.  

All résumé types are widely used. Choose the best type to highlight your skills and qualifications.  

Types of Résumés:

Reverse chronological: Most popular; emphasizes experience and employment history. Highlights information from most recent and relevant to oldest and least relevant.   

Functional:  100% skill based; emphasized specific skills and accomplishments.  Listing the skills by groups. Useful for those with gaps in work history, those who are seeking to change careers and those with a wide variety of skills.   

Combination: Combines the two; emphasizing skills and accomplishments, while also listing work history 

Examples of each type can be found here or use the template below to get started: 

Resume Packet

Resume Template 

Do’s:

  • Use plain font (Times New Roman, Arial, Calibri, Georgia, Cambria) with 10-12 font size
  • Keep it to 1-2 pages 
  • Use narrow margins to get more to fit on the page; Top: 0.6”-1” sides and bottom 0.5”-1” 
  • Use keywords in your résumé

Don’t:

  • Use templates, they can be hard to edit 
  • Use pronouns or first person (I, me, my)
  • Put your high school if you have attended secondary education 
  • Put educational institutions that you did not graduate from 
  • Use personal information (family, children, marital status, ethnicity, age, gender, religion, political affiliations, visa status or photographs)  
Transferable Skills

As you prepare for creating your résumé, it is important to know your own qualifications and which skills you have developed through your experiences.  These skills are called “transferable” skills because you can use them in several occupations regardless of the job types.  To identify your transferable skills, take a look at the skills worksheet on page 13 of the Career Service Handbook.    

Common transferable skills are:

Customer service

Trust

Planning

Communication

Respect

Time management

Listening

Self-motivated

Confident

Critical thinking

Creative

Quick Learner

Leadership

Team Player

Dependent

Computer Skills

Working Independently

Positive attitude


Once you have the transferable skills identified, you can move onto making powerful bullet points. 
 

Summary and Highlights

Creating a concise Summary and Highlights of Qualifications on your resume:

  • The Summary and Highlights area is a great place to highlight your skills and abilities in relation to the job you are applying for. 
  • For example, if you are looking to apply for a position as a customer service associate, it would be good to focus on your successes assisting people or phone skills. 
  • This really shows the employer you are the right person for the job. 
  • In this area it is also important to quantify any amount of experience or training you may have.  
  • Focus on Keywords in the Job Description
  • Be specific to the industry you are applying for 

Example Summary and Highlights of Qualifications Section:

SUMMARY

Business professional with 4 years of administrative experience as well as 10 years’ experience in customer service. Strong communication skills and willing to develop sales techniques. Depth of background includes data entry processes, filing, fielding calls, and greeting visitors. Able to appropriately resolve conflicts and escalated issues. Able to operate a PC, Microsoft Office Suite and internet research. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF QUALIFICATIONS

  • Knowledgeable of credit union services and products
  • Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal
  • Able to work with little supervision
  • Strong organizational skills and ability multi-task
Powerful Bullet Points

Resume Powerful Bullet Points

This is where you can give the reader a true picture of your skills and qualifications by making a powerful bullet point for each of your relevant transferable skills.  

Professional or Related Experience: 

  • This is the most important part of the résumé and usually the longest 
  • The purpose of this section is to show a potential employer you have the transferable skills to be successful in the position you are applying for.   
  • In this section, start with present or most recent position and work backwards 
  • Detail only the last four or five positions or employment covering the years in college, unless earlier information is relevant 

Within each position listed include: 

  • Your job title, company name, city, state and dates position was held (start & end date - year and month are sufficient) 
  • Describe your accomplishments, responsibilities and transferable skills 
  • Begin each bullet point with a third person, past tense action verb (for past positions) OR present tense action verb  – see below examples  
  • For your job descriptions please follow the following winning formula for job description 
    • Great job description= action + object + outcomes
    • The more that a past experience is related to the work you are seeking, the more space you should allot to its description.
    • When possible, note any achievements or key lessons learned from your experiences.
    • Highlight what you have done in a concise, powerful, action-oriented way.
    • Since position titles usually do not do justice to the work performed, it is advisable to highlight the functions for which you were responsible.
  • Be sure to list all substantial experiences, whether paid or unpaid. Employers like to see volunteer and community work. 
  • Be careful about listing multiple short term experiences (less than 6 months).  

Example Job Descriptions: 

  • Provided [action] clients [object] with timely financial information to make informed investment decisions [outcome]
  • Researched [action] specific retirement-related investment queries from clients [object] in a timely and efficient manner, ensuring high customer satisfaction [outcome]
  • Trained [action] new colleagues on international stock market overviews and trends [object] to ensure they followed internal protocol [outcome] 
  • Earned [action] Series 7 and Series 63 broker licenses [object]  in under six months [outcome]

Action Verbs: 

Management skills

Communication skills

Clerical or detailed skills

administered analyzed assigned consolidated coordinated delegated developed directed evaluated executed improved organized oversaw planned prioritized produced recommended reviewed strengthened supervised

addressed authored corresponded developed directed drafted edited enlisted formulated influenced interpreted mediated moderated motivated negotiated persuaded promoted publicized recruited wrote

approved arranged cataloged classified collected compiled dispatched inspected monitored operated organized prepared processed purchased recorded retrieved screened specified validated

More Power words or Keywords can be found in the Career Service Handbook.

 

References

References:

  • Whether you are job hunting or applying to graduate or professional school, gathering references is a very important.
  • Deciding whom to ask and then asking them can be difficult, to make it easier, plan ahead.
  • Develop and cultivate positive relationships with those who may later serve as references for you.
  • Choose your references carefully and ensure it will be someone who will speak highly of your skills, abilities and accomplishments.
  • When deciding who to ask to be your references also think of your audience.
  • Ask in advance and ask for permission to use people as references.
  • Ask your references what information they need from you.
  • References should all be professional (former or current boss, co-worker, school staff, instructor, etc.). Stay away from friends and family members. 
  • Provide your references with recommendation forms, if required.

Sample Professional Reference List:

Steve Smith

Lead Shift Supervisor — XYZ Company

(123) 456-7890

ssmith@xyzco.com

 

Sally Jones

Office Manager — ABC Supplies

(555) 123-4567

Sally_jones@abcsupplies.net

 

Doug Jones

Owner — General Real Estate

(555) 098-7654

djones@gre.com

 

Susan Johnson

Assistant Manager — AAA Inc.

(555) 555-5555

susanj@aaainc.com

Edit and Proofread
  • Review your résumé to ensure there are no spelling or grammatical errors
  • Don’t include your references or “References available upon request” on your résumé.  These can be provided during or after the interview when they are asked for.  
  • Send your résumé to the SmartThinking Tutor for review 
  • Set up an appointment with your career advisor at 800-609-1431 or naucareerservies@national.edu  
Job and Career Accelerator

NAU also has great resources such as the Job and Career Accelerator Résumé Builder to assist in building a great résumé.  

Log into the Job and Career Accelerator (JCA):

  1. Log into the Job and Career Accelerator here.
  2. Register or Log in; please follow the steps below or click on The Tutorial to Learn How to Register.
    • For new users register at the top right or by clicking on “Register” 
    • For existing users log in at the top right or click on “Login”
  3. Next click on the drop-down labeled “Resources” and click on “Tools to Get Hired”. 
  4. Then click on the “Launch” button next to “Build Your Résumé”. 
  5. Then click on “Add a Résumé ” to get started. 
  6. The résumé wizard will walk your through each step of building a résumé.
  7. Once you are complete reminder to save your work. The résumé will save onto the “My Career Dashboard” on the JCA.   
  8. You also have the option to download your résumé into the file of your choice by clicking on the blue download arrow.   
Resume Help Videos

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